Wapping station, then and now

13 October 2012 at 11:56 | Posted in Docklands past, Docklands present, Photos | 2 Comments
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Wapping station opened with its southern sister Rotherhithe in 1869, when the Thames Tunnel was converted from a foot tunnel to a railway. When London Underground closed service on the East London line in December 2007 for its transfer to London Overground, the station – along with others along the route – got a substantial facelift, as the following photos illustrate. The older pictures were taken around 1990, and the newer ones during the summer of 2012.

The station entrance has been rotated; where previously there was a narrow at the western corner, today there is a brighter entrance from the centre of the booking hall:

The ticket hall is virtually unrecognisable, with the entrance and staff accommodation moving, and the gateline being reorientated 90 degrees to face the larger entrance:

The top of the staircase from the ticket hall:

The bottom of the lifts:

The southbound platform from the northbound platform:

Much smarter stair access:

Top of the northbound platform:

Looking along the southbound platform:

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Rotherhithe station, then & now

2 September 2012 at 17:41 | Posted in Docklands past, Docklands present, Photos | Leave a comment
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Rotherhithe station first opened in 1869, when the Thames Tunnel was converted from a foot tunnel to a railway. It has changed a lot over the years, particularly above platform level, and when London Underground closed service on the East London line in December 2007 for its transfer to London Overground, the station – along with others along the route – got a substantial facelift.

The change over just the last 20 years is quite striking, as the following photos illustrate. The older pictures were taken around 1990, and the newer ones during the summer of 2012.

The station facade has been opened up to enlarge the entrance, making it more accessible and welcoming as these shots from 1990, 2007 and 2012 illustrate:

The ticket hall is virtually unrecognisable:

And as it looks to departing passengers:

The orange & brown later 1970s look has been replaced with a much more modern escalator enclosure:

The final drop to the platform is by stairs due to a lack of space for the escalators, and these too have been spruced up:

The bottom of the stairs are shown in these shots:

The platforms were pretty dreary before the 1990s installation of bright enamel panels along the walls. In the 1990 picture the view down the northbound platform shows the fairly dingy atmosphere compared with the modern shot:

Looking north along the same platform:

The southern end of the platforms lie under the Rotherhithe tunnel, which passes above. This view shows the southern end of the southbound platform with the Rotherhithe tunnel structure just visible, and in the modern shot shows the new emergency escape stairs to Albion Street, installed to supplement the main stairs in the event that a train needs to be evacuated:

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